Clickbank – 6 Foolproof Steps For Selecting a Profitable Clickbank Product

Searching the Clickbank marketplace for affiliate products that you would like to promote can be incredibly overwhelming when you first start out. There are many categories to search through with many subcategories, each with pages of products to choose from that you could choose to promote. Choosing a Clickbank product that is profitable isn’t really as difficult as you might think when you first examine Clickbank, just so long as you know exactly what to look for when you are examining the products and deciding which one to promote. Just follow these 6 foolproof steps for selecting a great Clickbank product.

1. Choose a Niche

The first thing you need to do is determine in which niche you are going to locate the products you intend to promote. The niche should be something that you have an interest or a general knowledge in, like possibly a hobby or something like that. That way you have your own unique knowledge from your experiences which you can use for marketing the product or products you decide to promote. Once you have determined which niche you are going to promote in, go to the Clickbank Marketplace and locate the category where your niche is and look at the list of products.

2. The Salespage

The first thing you need to look at with these products is the merchant’s salespage for the product you are considering promoting. The first thing you should look at is the layout of the sales letter. Is there a solid, enticing headline that will draw people in and make them want to read the rest of the sales letter? Also, it should have a good body copy that is interesting and to the point. One that will keep people wanting to read the whole sales letter. Also, it should contain strong bullet points that catch the readers attention and outline the benefits of the product. You should also make sure there are testimonials. A lack of testimonials creates a lack of trust in the product, so it probably won’t convert as well as a product that includes testimonials. The product should also have powerful bonuses that make the decision appear to be a no brainer because of their incredible value.

The sales letter should also contain a compelling call to action that encourages the reader to take action (and become a customer). Another great thing would be a time sensitive offer, such as a discount for a short period of time, or a limited number of bonuses. This is a great bonus because it creates a sense of urgency so people are rushed to make a decision before they lose the bonuses or the price goes up. This is not a necessity, but it does create a higher conversion rate, so it is definitely something you should look for. The last thing you should look for, although this is also not necessary, is to see if the page has eye- catching graphics. This just makes it look more professional, but it is not necessary. If the product contains everything else, but not very good graphics, it is still most likely a great product.

3. Quality of Product

If you are going to promote a product it is much easier to convince other people that it is a great product if you personally believe it is a great product. Now, this doesn’t mean you should go and buy every product you are considering promoting. Instead, all you have to do is contact the merchant and request a copy of the product or a review copy so that you can better promote their product. If you have a decent track record, most product owners will be happy to hand you a free copy so that you can make more sales. Once you have a copy, try out the product. Discover its good points and its poor points. Determine the overall quality of the product.

If the product is a piece of junk, then obviously you don’t want to promote it. If it is a good quality item, then you can check off #2. Now, if the product owner will not give you a copy and you don’t want to purchase a copy, then just read very carefully through the sales page to get a really good idea about what the product includes and how good it is. Then Google reviews for that product to see what other people have to say about it. If it looks good, then go with it. If you find a lot of bad reviews though, you might want to find a different product.

4. Commission Payouts

You need to check the commission percentage of the product and see if it is worth promoting. You want to be sure that you are going to actually make a profit from your efforts. Generally you do not want to promote a product that pays below $20. Also, I generally tend to stay away from some of the bigger items that pay a couple hundred dollars, because those generally have very high competition, as many people think that they are obviously the most profitable products to promote. (but you will not fall for that, right?)

The trick is to find something somewhere in between the two, something that pays a good amount, but not so much that there is a large amount of competition from other affiliates.

5. Gravity

The gravity shows how well the product is selling. The higher the gravity, the better the product is selling. But beware: higher gravity means that there are probably a lot of people promoting it, meaning you will have a lot of competition, so it may be harder for you personally to get the sales. I tend to try to find products that are above 50, but below 150. An exception would be if a product has just been released, then the gravity might be very low, so if it still meets all the other criteria, then it could still be OK to promote.

6. % Referred

This tells you what percent of the sales the merchant makes are from affiliates. If this is at 90% then it means affiliates are doing well selling this product, but it also means there is probably a lot of competition. Generally you want a percent referred of between 50% and 75-80%. Below that means affiliates aren’t doing well with it, and above that means that affiliates are probably doing too well, and you came too late.

BONUS TIP

If the product you are examining meets all the above criteria, then one more thing you can do to really make sure that it is the perfect product to promote, is to do a couple of Google and Yahoo! searches and find out if anyone is promoting the product you just examined. If there is no one promoting it, then that is a red flag, and you should drop it. (Although if it meets the above criteria that should definitely not happen)

If there are pages and pages of ads from other affiliates, then that is also a red flag. But if there are a few people promoting it, then that means it is profitable, and there is not a ton of competition. A perfect product!

If you simply follow these 6 simple steps, you will be able to pick a winning affiliate product in no time flat! But there is one key component not listed in the six steps. You have made the first step to your success by reading this. Now you have the knowledge, and with that knowledge you now have potential. But in order for you to reach your full potential you need to take action, as you will never achieve anything if you do not take action! Remember, “you reap what you sow”! So please, do not put it off another minute! Take action immediately!

Shawn Horwood

Generalizing: Learn the Lessons of History, But Which Ones?

A few months before Katrina, I caught one of the early Mardi Gras parades in a rural town outside New Orleans. Race relations there seemed different from those here in Northern California. Blacks were more outgoing and friendly to whites, and yet there also seemed to be more racial segregation. At the parade, the floats and teams were strictly segregated. The only integration I saw was a few clusters of black and white teens. I watched a policeman go out of his way to harass a black youth who was hanging out with some white girls.

As I was heading back to my car I saw one group by a 7-11 and thought to ask them directly about the state of race relations. A white girl spoke for them all, “Oh, it’s getting better. The police still give you a hard time but it’s not bad.” I thanked her and walked toward my car feeling pleased and hopeful; it was good to hear from a like-minded youth who was transcending past bigotries.

The girl called me back. “You say you’re from San Francisco?” she asked.

“Are they still letting gays marry there? ‘Cause I think that’s so disgusting.”

OK, not entirely like-minded. She had learned a lesson about bigotry, but she hadn’t generalized it. Me, I’ve seen enough instances of destructive bigotry to extrapolate to a universal pattern. Bigotry against blacks, Jews, the Irish, the Italians, the Chinese, gays-I get it-no bigotry is acceptable. What you don’t do to blacks you don’t do to gays either.

In this election I’m hoping a disenchanted nation will do some careful generalizing. Too much focus on Bush and Cheney’s bad character distracts us from questions about what makes them bad. If we conclude that they’re just bad apples, then what’s to stop equally counterproductive people with different names and faces from taking their places?

Everyone says, “People who don’t learn the lessons of history are forced to repeat it,” but if that statement doesn’t miss the point completely, it just barely grazes it. Sure, we should try to learn lessons-but the real question is which lessons, what generalizations? From Stalin and Hitler should we generalize to no more leaders with mustaches? No more short people?

What we want, of course, is to generalize lessons from history that end up paying off in the future. Unfortunately, although that’s a great goal, it’s useless as a rule of thumb. The future isn’t here yet, so you can’t use it directly to guide your generalizations.

“Son, my advice to you is buy low, sell high, and always learn today what worked tomorrow.”

Still, our society’s accelerated progress over the past few centuries is largely a product of culture realizing that right generalization is the name of the game. Science and engineering are largely attempts to systematize the process of effective generalization. In the hope of promoting that process, however slightly, here are a few generalizations about generalization applied to the coming election.

Undergeneralizing: Sometimes we fail to learn because we fail to generalize at all. Bush voters who now criticize the president tend to defend their votes. Yes, Bush turned out to be a lemon, an exception to the otherwise fine products of the conservative movement. Gore, Kerry, and the whole liberal agenda would have been much worse. McCain will fix things. Abu Ghraib? A few bad low-level soldiers. There’s nothing to learn, no generalization to be drawn.

When McCain said the economic problem was caused by greedy people on Wall Street and that the answer was to fire the head of the SEC, he sounded like unsophisticated leftists I knew in the ’70s. The problem is a few greedy people leading big corporations. Replace them with un-greedy people like me and it will all be groovy.

Overgeneralizing: Litmus-test radicals think they’ve found the one or two factors from which you can generalize to everything you need to know about a candidate. A Christian? Anti-abortion? For gay marriage? Divorced? A loyal spouse? For change? A traditionalist? The Sufis say, “He who’s burnt by hot milk blows on ice cream.” Not all dairy products will burn you. And not all Christians are great leaders. To litmus-test radicals on the left or the right, expert status isn’t earned through careful analysis but through passionate self-certainty. They’ve found the one cause that matters. It’s a priority not because they’ve compared it to other issues but because they can make an impassioned argument for its intrinsic and isolated merit. “But don’t you see, it’s a fundamental right!”

Motivated generalization: An alcoholic ponders what’s causing those daily hangovers. Monday: gin and tonic; Tuesday: vodka and tonic; Wednesday: whiskey and tonic; Thursday: rum and tonic. Clearly it’s the tonic.

Generalization serves two masters. One is, of course, our future selves. We hope to learn history’s real lessons so we don’t have to repeat them. The other is our present gut instinct, which definitely prefers some lessons to others. The alcoholic’s future self wants to avoid future hangovers, but the alcoholic’s gut doesn’t want to discover that those hangovers are caused by alcohol rather than tonic.

Most Republicans don’t seem to want to consider the possibility that they’ve had a substantial chance to try their ideas out in the real world and that in general those ideas don’t work as well as they had hoped. Just this week, days after the $700 billion bailout was announced, I was probing a right-wing friend about the core values and principles that drive his beliefs. He’s for the bailout as the lesser of two evils. On core values, though, he proudly told me one thing he knows for sure. Liberal efforts to regulate the free market have failed over and over and should never be tried again. No mention of the possibility that conservatives have anything to learn here.

This same friend tells me that he relishes arguing with liberals like me because our arguments are so weak and implausible. He’s the second conservative to tell me that this month. In other words, we generalize poorly. We’re either slow learners or we’re driven to our generalizations by our gut instincts, not our rational minds as they are.

Psychological research* indicates that we all generalize through two parallel systems, the rational mind and the gut, and that the gut predominates. The gut is faster acting than the rational mind. It’s often right or we wouldn’t survive. But there’s plenty of evidence that the gut gets it wrong consistently on crucial matters.

Ideally, therefore, we’d be rational about when to use our gut instincts and when to be rational. Among the more troubling findings therefore is strong evidence that most of us assume we’re more rational than we in fact are. We interpret gut instincts as rational instincts. Guts have the upper hand. Our guts tell us our rational minds are telling us that our rational minds are generalizing from the evidence and not our guts. We generalize incorrectly about our generalizing performance and skill.

Me and all my Obama-supporting friends included. We assume we’re the rational ones. Given the psychological evidence regarding everyone’s ability to interpret their interpretive prowess, we’re disqualified as authorities on the subject of our own rationality. So are our equally gut-motivated Republican detractors. Indeed, posterity gets the final word on whose generalizing skills were best. It alone knows how skillful we were at generalizing to the right lessons of history to learn and not the wrong ones. Unfortunately it was unavailable for comment at the time of this writing.For a great new survey of the findings, check out Nudge: Improving decisions about health wealth and happiness.

 

General Electronics – Gearing to a Wide Array of Applications

General electronics is a very broad category for a product. It refers to a lot of industries and applications. Nowadays, these types of gadgets are geared on energy-efficiency and user-friendly guidelines. Every time an innovation is launched in the market, companies never fail to incorporate it in the changes for these products.

It was mentioned awhile back that there are various applications for general electronics. As proof to this, the industries benefiting from these industrial products are discussed below.

Aviation industry

Electronics for this type of industry are made to have more power despite fuel reduction. Products have surpassed noise reduction requirements in the industry. A great example is the turbojet engine that paved the way to production of other engines for commercial, military, marine and corporate industries.

Consumer electronics

The list of electronic products will not be complete unless consumer electronics are mentioned. Providing the needs of clients worldwide, new technologies are injected in these products and services. Audio-visual components as well as telephone and computer accessories are found under the list of consumer electronics. Specifically, radios and television sets, digital cameras, generator systems, house wares and holiday lighting are enumerated under this electronics’ category.

Electrical distribution

Different industries benefit from this type of product from the general electronics line. Since electronics are somewhat synonymous to electric, electrical distribution should not be missed out on the list. The list of products includes appliance controls, arresters, automatic transfer switches, battery-powered equipment, circuit breakers, capacitors and drives.

It also contains products for communications and networking, energy management, motor control centers and power conversions. Reactors, push buttons and pilot devices, relays and timers form part of the enumeration as well.

The list of products for electrical distribution applies to commercial-electrical, industrial-electrical, residential-electrical and institutional-electrical requirements. They are also helpful for original equipment manufacturers and utility companies. When it comes to energy industries, electricity, gasification, hydro power or water control, nuclear energy, oil and gas, transmission and distribution and solar power companies benefit from these types of products.

General electronics is multi-faceted. Expect that there are more products listed under this industrial category. The list on this page is not enough to discuss all of the important facets of these products. On top of all the things you need to remember, electronics are updated to comply with the set standards of different industries. They are made to ensure the health of the individuals and companies that derive important uses from these materials.